Here’s Why You Don’t Need a Tribe, Pod or Anything Else

A while ago there was a lot of talk in the blogging community about blogging tribes and how it was the next must-have thing in the world of blogging. But lately there has been less talk of tribes and more of pods. A general pod or ones across social media – Instagram pods, Facebook pods. Pods for anything blogging related that you would like to improve. But, whether you call it a tribe or a pod it’s essentially the same thing – a group who help and support each other to inflate activity on their blogs and/or social media, to like, share, comment and generally engage with content.

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This sounds good, doesn’t it? Having all of those things increased, making your posts reach more people and making your words hit the eyes of of many more readers than you’d hoped. But, being in a pod or tribe can be all encompassing. You agree to like things, share things, comment on things – whatever the rules are to which you’ve agreed. It isn’t all rainbows and roses – you may not find the posts very inspiring or even interesting, you may not think the Instagram photos are very good and really the content may just not be things you really want to engage with – and you wouldn’t if you weren’t in that pod.

But everyone has a tribe or pod, don’t they? It’s what everyone does to get their content seen and to get somewhere, isn’t it?

Well, no. It isn’t. When you’re a new blogger there’s a lot of pressure to get to that theoretical somewhere as soon as possible – and yet it always seems so out of reach and pods and tribes seem appealing to get you there that bit quicker.

I’ve never had a tribe or a pod and instead I have a few close blogging friends who I can bounce ideas off, who I can talk to about pretty much anything and who really understand this blogging life. They are people who read my posts because they enjoy them – and who I know will skip the posts that don’t interest them.

They are people who will spot typos, who will share content naturally if it fits with what they would usually share and who will engage with me on social media if they want to. But they would never feel forced to do any of those things and they don’t do it because they’re my friends either – they do it because, as a blogger, you do naturally share content and engage on social media with things that interest you.

So, my point is, you don’t need a tribe. You need other bloggers to talk to and to bounce things off, you need the blogging community for advice and support and you need to create content that is as sharable and as engaging as you possibly can.

If you keep writing and keep using social media you really don’t need a tribe or a pod. People naturally engage and using tribes and pods purely inflate your statistics temporarily whilst you’re in that pod and it won’t really add anything long term apart from being one extra thing on your to-do list each day.

For me, long term blogging is all about growing. Growing your content, growing your social media, growing your blog and growing your blogging circle of friends. This can all be done naturally, organically and steadily over time without tribes, pods or anything else.

Just keep writing, create content and the rest will come.

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26 thoughts on “Here’s Why You Don’t Need a Tribe, Pod or Anything Else

  1. Could not agree more!! I joined an Instagram pod, for maybe a week, but it really wasn’t for me. I think you’re right, it’s much better to let virtual relationships grow with people you connect with naturally. There’s much more enjoyment to be had in connecting with people organically xxx
    Kerry recently posted…Baby it’s Cold OutsideMy Profile

  2. Part of me really wants to agree with this, and I know pods are, in a way, unnatural. But I’ve taken part in a couple of pods recently, and I’ve found it’s helped me to develop those blogging connections you speak of. Yes, there is a bit of “forced” commenting occasionally, but mostly it’s helped me find and develop friendships with really lovely bloggers. Especially if you’re not as established, or don’t go to lots of events etc. So what I’m trying to say is, pods aren’t all bad!
    Naomi recently posted…Christmas Countdown: 3 Weeks to goMy Profile

    1. Agree completely, there will be people they work for – especially if you have a pod with the right kind of people in it. My point was just that if people feel they ‘should’ be in one, and it’s the only way of getting their blog out there, then they don’t need to worry x

  3. I tried this recently but quickly realised it wasn’t for me. It felt false to be sharing blog posts that I sometimes didn’t agree with. Growing naturally might take longer but in the long term I definitely think it’s best.
    Angela Webster recently posted…NativityMy Profile

  4. I occasionally join comment threads when I want to shake up new blogs to read (not sure if they are pods, tribes, gangs or whatever!) I’m sure this isn’t the main purpose of them but I have loved seeing different formats of blogs. You are so good at mixing with other bloggers and supporting them and obviously post great content – its no wonder they consistently come back to you! x
    Helen at Casa Costello recently posted…Hygge Living For Busy FamiliesMy Profile

  5. I completely agree – and hope that people don’t feel FOMO if they aren’t doing this either. I am not in anything, because I too want to have the freedom (and time) to find my own way without being ‘restricted’. I think that my style has developed rapidly too because I can spend this precious time finding other blogs / Instagram feeds that I truly love to follow rather than the same ones each day. I too have a few really good blogging friends that are at the same stage as me and who I can talk openly to. Jess xx
    mummyofboygirltwins recently posted…Home Etc #80My Profile

  6. Agree in part – but Facebook just won’t show my content unless my pod helps me boost it. I don’t do any other pods now though, just that. And my blogging tribe ARE my friends – that’s just what we call each other! 🙂

  7. I needed to read this today as I think about leaving some Instagram pods. I find them a bit exhausting and there are some peoples stuff I’m forced to comment on that I just wouldn’t otherwise. It does feel a little like ‘cheating’ doesn’t it. But if everyone else does it and you don’t I worry I will never be able to ‘compete’? I feel similarly about linkies!
    Nyomi recently posted…When your kid isn’t excelling at schoolMy Profile

    1. I love linkies, and have found some of my favourite blogs through linkies but they really aren’t for everyone. For me, linkies are all about community rather than reciprocating comments etc because I feel obliged. Ah I love linkies! x

  8. Blogging friends to bounce ideas off, and discuss thing sounds a lot less pressured and more natural and beneficial. I love the idea of genuinely supporting each other rather than an exchange/transaction (if that makes sense). For me though, It’s sometimes difficult and can feel like I am blogging in to a vacuum, or rather talking into a room which is already crowded with chatter, when you don’t have blogging friends. I think that’s another reason why pods and tribes maybe have an appeal.
    Jenni – Odd Socks and Lollipops recently posted…Childs Farm Little Essentials Kit – Review & GiveawayMy Profile

    1. Yep, I think when bloggers are starting out and don’t have those blogging connections or even more established bloggers that have never really found blogging friends they can be useful x

    1. Ah Jen, I’m always here 🙂 Blogging can often feel a very solitary thing and even me – chatting to people every day – I can often feel like I’m just me doing my thing and a bit detached from other bloggers. It’s often hard to find like minded bloggers though x

  9. I know what you mean about the pods and I agree to what your saying, I don’t really use them!! Having a group of like minded bloggers is definitely the way forward. I’m glad i found my tribe fairly early on I think I would have quit already otherwise. They spur me on and show me what is possible. It’s inspiring! ????
    Karen recently posted…#FamilyFun Week 14My Profile

  10. Well said, Donna – it’s something that’s riled me for YEARS! I’ve spoken out about it plenty of times.
    If you write decent content it will be found, read and shared, ad infinitum. IMHO tribes create false shares and stats for PR’s only and create an even smaller community than the one you think you have.

  11. My problem is that I am eventually running out of idea. It was really bad over the summer period actually. Since then my stats have spike up again drastically but to keep it there is the hard bit. I can’t come up with great content sometimes so the content I do come up with I try to promote in pods.
    Janine Dolan recently posted…Ice Skating and Baby CuddlesMy Profile

  12. Love this Donna. I am yet to find blogging “friends” I’d say -I chat to lots of bloggers and engage but I feel kinda alone still! But I try and remember why I did this and it wasn’t to make millions or have a load of friends. it was to write, and put my time and effort into something I cared about. all of this – the social element and all you lovely bloggers – I didn’t even realise you were all out there to get to know! it’s an added bonus hehe x

  13. PODs and tribes both sound so fake. This approach to blogging doesn’t sound like a natural nor honest way to go about building and engaging with an audience. Also, it sounds like a lot of hard work to promote and endorse things you may dislike and even disagree with.

  14. I agree, although I’ve nothing against people that use them. I was in an Instagram pod but left as it felt fake and I felt under pressure to keep up. Same with a Facebook one. I knew the comments I got weren’t genuine either. I have an unofficial tribe of blogging buddies which is better. Thank you for linking up to #Blogschool xxx
    Jenny recently posted…2 Ingredient Chocolate Coconut Ganache (No cream)My Profile

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